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Topics - ZookeeperGeorgia

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Zoo for Adult Learners / Anthony's Galaxy Zoo Lab
« on: September 10, 2009, 06:15:41 pm »
Hi Everyone,

At the Greenwich meeting this summer, I was lucky enough to meet John Wallin and talk a bit about using Galaxy Zoo in the classroom. His graduate student, Anthony, has written a lab that uses Galaxy Zoo, and he was kind enough to allow me to share it with you. Here is the text of Anthony's email:

Georgia,

I've attached the lab material to this message.  The files are in MS Word format.  Let me know if you need a different format.

The lab involves using Galaxy Zoo 2 to learn some basic trends about elliptical and disk galaxies.  Blueness/Redness and young/old.  There is a section about our Mergers activity, but that is completely separable if you want to just do the main Zoo portion.

The main document is called galaxylab_summer09.doc.  We have an exercise for our students to complete before they get to class, that's the prelab.  The answer sheet printed strangely sometimes, so I have also attached a screen shot of what the last portion should look like.  That is for the Mergers activity.  Again, that part can be cut out altogether if you prefer.

As we finish our preparations for the launch of the Mergers site, we'll be updating the tutorial and science information there.  So depending on when people plan on doing this activity, we'll have to provide you an up-to-date URL for the site.

HTH,
Anthony


Anthony has offered to be of assistance if there are any questions--just PM me and I can give you his email.

Thanks, Anthony!!  ;D ;D

[I had to upload the files as PDFs... if you would like the .doc format, email me and I'll send them to you.--Georgia]

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WELCOME TO THE NEW EDUCATION AREA! / A Brief Introduction
« on: September 02, 2009, 03:27:50 pm »
Hello Everyone!  

This is a new area of the forum dedicated to the discussion of using Galaxy Zoo in a variety of educational settings--classrooms, nature centers, museums, scout gatherings, the kitchen table  :D , etc. Most of the boards are organized according to the age of the learner, but almost all these ideas and activities are adaptable to many levels of skill and knowledge, so don't let the age level limit your browsing! Feel free to discuss and share activities and any tips on making Galaxy Zoo a success in the classroom--formal or informal. And if you try some of the activities, we'd love to have the benefit of your experience! Let us know how it goes!

Enjoy!
 ;D

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Bingo game with various Messier objects (many galaxies!). Links to download bingo cards are on left margin of the website. Program generates the objects which are called out.

4
Standards / Project 2061 Science Benchmarks (US)
« on: July 25, 2009, 10:28:09 pm »
The online version of the Benchmarks is here.

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Zoo for Adult Learners / Galaxy Activity from SDSS
« on: July 25, 2009, 09:38:13 pm »
Well, here's a set of more advanced activities from our ol' buddy Sloan. Topics include the Hubble Tuning Fork classification scheme and galaxy clusters.

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Teen Zoo: 13-18 Year olds / "Galaxy Hunter"
« on: July 25, 2009, 09:27:52 pm »
In-depth activity for use with the Hubble Deep Field image. Tackles the tougher concepts of bias, sampling, and some statistics.

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Young Zoo: 5-8 Year Olds / "Galaxy Concentration"
« on: July 25, 2009, 09:11:29 pm »
A fun memory game with galaxy pictures! Work on your memory as you compare and contrast galaxy types. Turn on sound for cool music when you win! ;-)

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From NASA and the Space Telescope Science Institute, a great group activity with teacher resources is found on this page.

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Little Zoo: 3-5 Year Olds / Glitter (yay!) Galaxy
« on: July 25, 2009, 08:25:20 pm »
This activity is called Glitter Galaxy Craft, and is simple enough for the young ones. A beautiful sparkly galaxy is made with just glue, glitter, and black paper. I'd enhance the activity by having the students put the bar in the Milky Way, then go on to create the other types of galaxies--elliptical and irregular. Have pictures on hand as models. And remember, be prepared: glitter = fun AND glitter = mess ;-)

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Standards / National Education Standards (US)
« on: July 25, 2009, 07:49:08 pm »
The US National Education Standards can be read online here.

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"But In MY Classroom..." / What should you post in this section?
« on: July 25, 2009, 06:26:14 pm »
Every teaching situation is different, and we'd like to help make Galaxy Zoo work well in YOUR teaching environment, whether it be formal, informal, involving many students, or just a few. Start a new thread to tell us about your situation and your particular need. We are happy to help!

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Outreach / "How to Take Part" Poster
« on: July 19, 2009, 06:46:28 pm »
This is a "preview"  of a poster that was used at a recent public event. It is too big to upload to the forum (about 2 MB), but if you would like the file, send an email to galaxyzoo@siue.edu.  Feel free to reprint and share!  ;D


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Latest News from Galaxy Zoo / Galaxy Zoo at AAS Summer Meeting
« on: June 02, 2009, 12:35:53 pm »
Hi Everyone,

In a few days I'll be heading westward to attend the American Astronomical Society's summer meeting in Pasadena, CA. Galaxy Zoo will be well-represented there through talks, posters, and public outreach. A few zookeepers are also attending, and I will be posting as much as I can here (including pictures) about all the festivities (I'll have more free time than the zookeepers, heh, heh... ;))

The day before the meeting starts, Galaxy Zoo will be one of the many astronomy activities and displays featured in the IYA 2009 Bazaar and AstroZone. Laptops will be on hand at the Galaxy Zoo table, and we hope to have HUGE crowds of all ages stopping by to give it a try!

These meetings are a wonderfully overwhelming combination of trying to take in all the latest astronomy research you possibly can (think fire hose) and having fun with a bunch of amazing people. Of course, some people just have too much fun, as evidenced by this picture from the last AAS meeting:



These zookeepers were caught blatantly goofing off when they should have been doing some serious socializing/drinking up at the bar. Typical...   ;D ;D



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