Author Topic: Links  (Read 1860 times)

echo-lily-mai

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Links
« on: November 24, 2009, 05:24:40 pm »
« Last Edit: November 24, 2009, 05:31:30 pm by echo-lily-mai »

Art does not reproduce the visible....  Paul Klee

Alice

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Re: Links
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2009, 06:45:23 pm »
We should probably move them all in here - I will ask the others - thanks! ;D

Budgieye

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Re: Links
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2010, 06:33:36 am »
When I was at AstroFest 2010 in London, the University of Central Lancashire had a booth set up.

There was a computer monitor showing an animated clip of galaxy interactions in 3D! You have to put on circularly polarized glasses to see it. I was so delighted, there were streams of stars going behind other galaxies, and coming out from the screen. There was no guessing about which direction the attacking galaxy was coming from. Shredded bits of galaxy were zooming away in every 3D direction.
Victor P. Debattista told me that it took a week of high powered computer time to generate the animation, which lasted about a minute. I forgot to ask if it was based on a real cluster.
Here is his website, but it is just not the same. The animation was so pretty! and useful and educational.  You had to be there.
http://www.star.uclan.ac.uk/~vpd/index.html

echo-lily-mai

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Re: Links
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2010, 09:19:59 am »
When I was at AstroFest 2010 in London, the University of Central Lancashire had a booth set up.

There was a computer monitor showing an animated clip of galaxy interactions in 3D! You have to put on circularly polarized glasses to see it. I was so delighted, there were streams of stars going behind other galaxies, and coming out from the screen. There was no guessing about which direction the attacking galaxy was coming from. Shredded bits of galaxy were zooming away in every 3D direction.
Victor P. Debattista told me that it took a week of high powered computer time to generate the animation, which lasted about a minute. I forgot to ask if it was based on a real cluster.
Here is his website, but it is just not the same. The animation was so pretty! and useful and educational.  You had to be there.
http://www.star.uclan.ac.uk/~vpd/index.html

No Way this is something I MUST see! Budgieye you are so lucky.   8)  8)  8)  3D galaxies was just mentioned here

Can these be seen with normal 3D glasses? (Goes off to find silly looking glasses)


Art does not reproduce the visible....  Paul Klee

Budgieye

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Re: Links
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2010, 03:33:53 pm »
The galaxies were zillions of white stars against a blue background. The red/blue glasses are a different kind of 3D.
I wish I had taken a picture with my camera.
He says that sometimes he shows it in a large screen in an auditorium, and it looks even more impressive. I will post info for the next time he shows it.

echo-lily-mai

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Re: Links
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2010, 03:44:48 pm »
Please do post info it would be awesome to see. Hmmmm maybe another Zoo meet up!  :D

Art does not reproduce the visible....  Paul Klee

Budgieye

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Re: Links
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2010, 01:16:21 am »
V.  Dibattista's presentation of the interacting galaxies again
Preston, April 21, 2010

http://www.uclan.ac.uk/news/files/lecture_series09_10.pdf