Author Topic: Hubble: QSO's  (Read 32916 times)

c_cld

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #30 on: June 16, 2010, 06:30:55 am »
AHZ10002gy  12020610  Redshift: 0.3696

nothing in Aegis, Ned

Oozyzoozy

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #31 on: June 16, 2010, 02:15:49 pm »

13042098 Details: AHZ10005bw   Redshift: 3.07     :o 8)

You are finding evidence that these things are at least suspected of being QSO's, not just bright compact objects, aren't you?  NED says this is just a galaxy.
SDSS J142047.46+530536.1       14h20m47.4s +53d05m36s G
OK, I'll grant you that unless they goosed the exposeure time, at that distance if it's this bright it might be a QSO.  But I don't think we should necessarily presume so.

Thanks for your respone Paul. 
Quote
You are finding evidence that these things are at least suspected of being QSO's, not just bright compact objects, aren't you?  NED says this is just a galaxy.

I don't know what I'm finding evidence of... ???  What basic criteria would you suggest for identifying a QSO before posting in this thread?  Your first example  AHZ40000s4  Is listed as a QSO in NED, is that the main criteria and anything marked G is suspect?  What if there is nothing in NED?  Some more clues how you identify QSOs would be a big help   ;D   BerniE   

Oozyzoozy

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #32 on: June 16, 2010, 03:33:14 pm »
This was an easy one...

Ref: 90031890 ID: AHZ40006at  Redshift: 1.03  NED gives a larger redshift:

                                     Object   Velocity/Redshift     
       RA               DEC      Type       km/s       z                           
03h32m34.4s -27d39m13s QSO    >30000  1.511500

Light Travel-Time                :    9.092 Gyr
Age at Redshift 1.511112     :    4.207 Gyr
Age of Universe                  :   13.299 Gyr


If anybody else is a Quasar newbie check out: http://cas.sdss.org/dr6/en/proj/advanced/quasars/default.asp
Great stuff!!!  Great introduction. Has spectra for a typical star, a typical galaxy and a typical quasar.  Plus much more.  Help with an SQL search to downlod quasar data and things to analyse it for.  You won't get back to classifying for hours...  :o   BerniE.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 03:55:15 pm by Oozyzoozy »

paulrogers

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #33 on: June 17, 2010, 06:05:48 am »
I don't know what I'm finding evidence of... ???  What basic criteria would you suggest for identifying a QSO before posting in this thread?  Your first example  AHZ40000s4  Is listed as a QSO in NED, is that the main criteria and anything marked G is suspect?  What if there is nothing in NED?  Some more clues how you identify QSOs would be a big help   ;D   BerniE

That's the main way I come to suspect it may be a QSO, yes. ::) :P  Some of the SDSS Explorer pages sometimes mentioned a QSO possibility, I'd post those.  Sometimes it mentioned QSO as a warning, I didn't post those.  We have to hunt more these days.  I can't get anything relevant from AEGIS, but I do check through what NED gives.  If all I see just says galaxy I'll let it pass.  You may have seen three I posted in the "Blue Peas" thread instead.  QSO, Quasi-Stellar (Radio) Objects.  It's supposed to look like a star--that's why I questioned that red galaxy, and the new one.  I'll leave it to others to expound on what the Blue Peas might be.

paulrogers

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #34 on: June 17, 2010, 04:56:24 pm »
Here's one.  NED says:
EIS J033242.71-275434.5        03h32m42.7s -27d54m34s QSO
So it is a QSO, as opposed to just "something bright and localized without an apparent association of surrounding stars".  And that's not to say that we should never respond to a strong hunch that something probably is a QSO.  Maybe that sort of thing might be an as yet unidentified QSO, or not.  Maybe it's "God knows what" too.

ID: AHZ40007ak
z=1.12
« Last Edit: June 17, 2010, 06:04:39 pm by paulrogers »

Budgieye

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #35 on: June 21, 2010, 06:12:05 am »
one definite quasar, with the MgII peak

I think that at this z, the Hubble spectra have two emission peaks, one in the blue  image and one in the orange image.
It seems to make clean diffraction lines around the quasar.
[EDIT: I have looked up the ACW camera, and it doesn't seem to use a refracting lens anywhere)
http://tkserver.keck.hawaii.edu/egs/dataAccess/notebook/egs_notebook.php?serial=13035333
http://cas.sdss.org/dr7/en/tools/explore/obj.asp?id=587735665306763384

AEGIS - SDSS
 

 
« Last Edit: July 07, 2010, 06:54:57 am by Budgieye »

Budgieye

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #36 on: June 21, 2010, 07:08:31 am »
listed as QSO in NED,
No real spectrum? only a PhotoZ 0.74, so I suppose it is not proven

http://www.galaxyzoo.org/examine/AHZ4000341
http://zoo-hst.s3.amazonaws.com/90018172.jpg
« Last Edit: June 21, 2010, 07:16:19 am by Budgieye »

JeanTate

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #37 on: June 22, 2010, 01:47:51 pm »

AHZ3000187, z = 1.02.
NED says it's a Sy1 (Seyfert 1 galaxy), and gives it an SDSS ID (SDSS J123706.87+621702.0).

However, the object has many IDs, and one of them classifies it as a QSO (it's an x-ray source, so it would be most spectacular Sy1 at that distance!

c_cld

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #38 on: June 22, 2010, 02:39:07 pm »

AHZ3000187, z = 1.02.
NED says it's a Sy1 (Seyfert 1 galaxy), and gives it an SDSS ID (SDSS J123706.87+621702.0).

However, the object has many IDs, and one of them classifies it as a QSO (it's an x-ray source, so it would be most spectacular Sy1 at that distance!

Hi Jean,
This QSO 50010874 is in the recent and last catalog "Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei (13th Ed.) (Veron+ 2010)" with a classification quasar S1 : Seyfert 1 spectrum.

What i wonder is if there is a lensing effect (sort of Einstein's cross ) when looking at "Goods images": a blob is clearly seen in north BVi and two fuzzy NE and SE (if north up and east left)
 

588011123577651292


« Last Edit: June 22, 2010, 02:44:32 pm by c_cld »

JeanTate

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #39 on: June 22, 2010, 04:28:41 pm »

90002994 (Rowan Watson), a.k.a. AHZ400002c

NED gives ambiguous results.

paulrogers

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #40 on: June 22, 2010, 05:24:52 pm »
I think this may be one. ;)  That bright blue core was the clue to send me looking.

http://www.galaxyzoo.org/examine/AHZ400018j
NED says:
COMBO-17 14335                 03h31m51.0s -27d57m16s G
just a Galaxy, but a bit further on, also:
CROSS-IDENTIFICATIONS for COMBO-17 14335
Object Names    Type    Object Names    Type
COMBO-17 14335   G    CXOYECDF J033151.0-275716    XrayS

and:
Light Travel-Time          :    2.215 Gyr
Age at Redshift 0.187611   :   11.084 Gyr

Closer than I'd've guessed.  z=0.187611?  Even with a redshift, I didn't find a spectrum.

The X-ray source matches the coordinates Michael's new page gives us.  OK, maybe an Xray source might not be a QSO, but it might be, if'n we had a spectrum to look at.  So I'll post this as a "maybe". ;)

Oozyzoozy

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #41 on: June 22, 2010, 06:36:28 pm »

Ref: 90005378 ID: AHZ40006jo  Redshift: 0.97




Oozyzoozy

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #43 on: June 23, 2010, 10:48:13 pm »
Oozydoozy told me to post it here, as NED says it's a QSO.



AHZ40003v4

Survey: GEMS and GOODS-S
Survey reference: 90024646


I forgot to add deivad that your galaxy may also be an overlap.  It is listed as a QSO in NED but I'm not sure if that applies to ALL the light blue clumpy material surrounding the nucleus.  I'd be interested to see paulrogers' views on this galaxy, he originated the QSO thread.   BerniE


StephanieC

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Re: Hubble: QSO's
« Reply #44 on: June 24, 2010, 01:47:49 pm »
ID: AHZ300012n
Survey reference: 50009478
Redshift: 1.139000