Author Topic: Viewing GZ images in different wavelengths  (Read 1736 times)

Notes

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Viewing GZ images in different wavelengths
« on: July 24, 2013, 08:01:39 pm »
Could someone please explain the purpose of the different buttons and algorithms available for viewing images in different wavelengths.  I think I can work out roughly what the different letters mean, but what information is a scientist able to derive by viewing in specific wavelengths?

JohnF

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Re: Viewing GZ images in different wavelengths
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2013, 08:18:39 pm »
Welcome to the Zoo Notes, this might help - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronomical_spectroscopy
John C. Fairweather - http://www.jcfwebsite.co.uk

Notes

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Re: Viewing GZ images in different wavelengths
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2013, 09:41:29 pm »
It's a start, although I would like some pointers on what we might be looking for in the different wavelengths, or conversely, what the absence of certain wavelengths will uncover.

I am currently guessing that u,g,r,i,z relates to ultraviolet, gamma, red, near-infrared and far infrared wavelengths?

Geoff

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Re: Viewing GZ images in different wavelengths
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2013, 08:42:11 am »
Hi Notes, you could start with this SDSS Link and follow links from the main article for more information. Hopefully this will help.
  Sometimes I think we're alone. Sometimes I think we're not. In either case, the prospect is staggering!- Arthur C. Clarke

Notes

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Re: Viewing GZ images in different wavelengths
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2013, 09:03:57 pm »
Hi Geoff, thanks for that,  I found a useful link under 'filters' which explained pretty much the letter codes used.  It's interesting to see that SDSS is measuring in Angstroms rather than nanometres.