Author Topic: Saturday, 15 February, 2014: Publication = Discovery  (Read 7196 times)

mlpeck

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Re: Saturday, 15 February, 2014: Publication = Discovery
« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2014, 10:59:32 pm »
I am still fascinated by these "Genuine Irregular Galaxies" that don't actually meet Terao+'s criteria for GIGs. This is the third object that appears to be interacting. In fact it's the southern member of ARP 202, AKA NGC 2719/2719A, etc. The companion to the north was a BOSS target but the fiber was unplugged, but it does have a redshift and yes they're the same (z=0.0102, 0.0103). I zoomed this finder chart image out because the faint galaxy to the SE has a redshift in the same range (z = 0.0109).



I wonder if Terao et al. has been accepted for publication, and if so why.

zutopian

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Re: Saturday, 15 February, 2014: Publication = Discovery
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2014, 05:42:24 am »
I am still fascinated by these "Genuine Irregular Galaxies" that don't actually meet Terao+'s criteria for GIGs. This is the third object that appears to be interacting. In fact it's the southern member of ARP 202, AKA NGC 2719/2719A, etc. The companion to the north was a BOSS target but the fiber was unplugged, but it does have a redshift and yes they're the same (z=0.0102, 0.0103). I zoomed this finder chart image out because the faint galaxy to the SE has a redshift in the same range (z = 0.0109).



I wonder if Terao et al. has been accepted for publication, and if so why.

That's NA10-23. There is given following statement on page 14.:
Quote
B. COMMENTS ON THE GIGS WITH APPARENT COMPANION
Here we give comments on the following four GIGs with apparent companion in their images shown in Figure 6: F07-22, F07-23, NA10-23, and NA10-29.:
NA10-23: There is a large blue extended object at N of NA10-23. It is classified as a galaxy in the SDSS DR10 and does not have a spectroscopic information. Its photometric redshift is highly uncertain and includes the redshift of NA10-23 (= 0.011) within 1 error. However, no signature of interaction is seen in the N galaxy albeit its relatively high surface brightness (= 21.75 mag arcsec−2).
http://arxiv.org/abs/1312.0364

mlpeck:
Quote
The companion to the north was a BOSS target but the fiber was unplugged, but it does have a redshift and yes they're the same (z=0.0102, 0.0103).

It hasn't a redshift in DR10.: z is 0.000, but there is a redshift available in NED.: z=0.010264. I guess, that you cited the NED redshift.
In conclusion, interacting galaxies.

As far as I know, the paper hasn't been accepted for publication yet. So I think, it would be fine, if you would inform the authors or the journal about the misidentified galaxies (so far 3), which are actually interacting. Who knows, if the referee noticed it also!
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014, 12:17:04 pm by zutopian »

mlpeck

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Re: Saturday, 15 February, 2014: Publication = Discovery
« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2014, 03:59:02 pm »
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I guess, that you cited the NED redshift.

Yes, I checked NED for the redshifts. There are both optical and 21 cm. redshifts in the literature, with optical redshifts published as early as Page (1970). Of note also is Keel et al. (1985).