Author Topic: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?  (Read 22240 times)

JeanTate

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Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« on: February 21, 2014, 03:12:33 pm »


No, that's not a strange spiral!  :P That's M87, perhaps the most famous giant-elliptical-with-an-active-SMBH-and-jet; you can see the jet in the optical in this DR10 SDSS image (it's the small white streak at ~2 o'clock).

If we change the scale in a bit, and switch to the radio part of the spectrum, the jet is much more obvious, and we can also see huge clouds of plasma (hot, ionized gas), called lobes ... and the stars have disappeared (source, data is from the Very Large Array radio telescope):



Radio jets and lobes and giant elliptical galaxies are common companions; the super-massive black holes (SMBHs) associated with AGNs (active galactic nuclei) in elliptical galaxies somehow seem to often produce one or two radio jets and/or radio tails and/or lobes1.



The galaxy in the center is, obviously, not an elliptical. It is also - obviously - associated with a pair of radio jets/lobes. This galaxy is called 0313-192  ::) and is the subject of a 2006 paper by W. Keel, R. White, F. Owen, and M. Ledlow2 (you might recognize the first author ... he's none other than our very own zooite, NGC3314!).

Since 2006, a small number of papers have reported similar spiral/radio jet/lobe associations; unfortunately, all the objects seem to be like 0313-192, outside the SDSS footprint!  :(

So, there are (tens of? hundreds of??) thousands of ellipticals-with-jets/lobes, but just a tiny handful of spirals-with-jets/lobes, maybe only three. Or, as raynorris (scientist) said, on December 19 2013, over in Radio Galaxy Zoo (RGZ) Talk:

Quote
Keep an eye out for any #hourglass sources that seem to be hosted by galaxies that look spiral in the infrared. These objects are incredibly rare in the local Universe (only 2 or 3 known) and we may not see any in Radio Galaxy Zoo, but if someone does find one, that would be worth writing a paper about (with the discoverer as co-author, of course). The rarity of radio-loud spirals is thought to be because the radio jets heat up and disrupt the gas in the spiral, switching off star formation, and turning the galaxy into a "red dead" elliptical. But we might find one or two where the jets have only just switched on and haven't yet destroyed the spiral.









That is a compilation of SDSS DR10 images of galaxies which seem to be associated with jets/lobes, found by RGZ zooites; respectively (click the links for details): infobservador (ARG0002zck, SDSS J154336.07+110512.9), WizardHowl (ARG0001zj8, SDSS J122640.22+253855.5), infobservador (ARG0002esa, SDSS J140535.56+190612.9), and WizardHowl3 (ARG00022wh, SDSS J112811.63+241746.9). It's not complete - there are certainly others which have been reported by zooites, in RGZ - but they're the only ones I could find after an hour or two's searching4 (and which are more than a spiral associated with radio emission only in/from the nucleus/bulge).

Can you find spirals with jets or lobes, 'hourglass' or 'doublelobe' radio sources? Come along to RGZ and start classifying!  ;D

1 for more on this topic check out the GZ blog posts Tailed Radio Galaxies: Cometary-Shaped Radio Sources in Clusters of Galaxies (Part 1), More Information on Tailed Radio Galaxies (Part 2), How do black holes form jets?, The Curious Lives Of Radio Galaxies – Part One, and The Curious Lives of Radio Galaxies – Part Two (there are more, this is just a 'starter selection')

2 The image is from Hubblesite, "Credit: NASA, W. Keel (University of Alabama), M. Ledlow (Gemini Observatory), F. Owen (NRAO) and AUI/NSF"

3 Unfortunately, I don't seem to be able to make composite SDSS/radio images  :'(

3 Talk's search tool has got to be one of the primitive, inflexible, tiresome search tools ever invented!  >:(

ETA: I've added some names to the RGZ candidates, to more easily keep track of them
« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 09:40:01 pm by JeanTate »

AlexandredOr

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2014, 05:41:46 pm »
Great OotD !!
Many thanks Jean  :)

Baby star opening its eyes on the Universe.

JeanTate

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2014, 12:29:31 am »
Did any GZ zooites discover unusual radio galaxies? is the title of a thread I began earlier today, over in RGZ (Radio Galaxy Zoo) Talk.

Here's what I posted (extract):

Quote
As of just now, there are 262 posts in the GZ forum's Radio source thread, dating from December 09, 2007.

Many posts in that thread report a positional (on the sky) co-location of an SDSS object - usually a galaxy - and a radio source as identified in an online catalog, often NED; quite a few posts do not report the source for the radio object.

[...]

Is there a reasonably straight-forward way of checking what zooites have posted in that thread?

For example, how to obtain a FIRST image, with the appropriate 'plate scale', and overlay it on the SDSS image of what is obviously a spiral galaxy (to see, for example, if it's an hourglass or doublelobe, or if there's a jet)?

JeanTate

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2014, 12:43:18 am »
I posted this, in the Hourglass sources associated with spiral galaxies thread in RGZ Talk:

Quote
Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals? {link removed} is an OOTD (Object of the Day) I just posted in the Galaxy Zoo forum.

In it I posted SDSS images of four galaxies which RGZ zooites have found to be associated with radio structures that are more than just nuclear, perhaps jet(s) and/or lobe(s); "found" as in posted here in a Talk thread.

I'm sure there are more, but I grew so frustrated with my inability to find things here, efficiently and effectively, that I gave up looking after a couple of hours.

Normally I'd post composite images - SDSS and FIRST overlaid, for example - but failed in this case, because I discovered I do not know how to do this, quickly and easily. Anyone?

WizardHowl replied, very soon afterwards:

Quote
This was one found by antikodon that I remembered HAndernach commented on: http://radiotalk.galaxyzoo.org/#/subjects/ARG00036hs

If you click the link, you'll see that zooite antikodon wrote, on January 27 2014 2:11 PM, "#overedge #doublelobe host (?)"; HAndernach (SCIENTIST) replied, at 8:49 PM the same day, "SDSS J132435.81+084635.5= ASK 482820.0, an IR- and HI emitting spiral with an FRII morphology, EXTREMELY RARE, should be followed up!"

Here is SDSS J132435.81+084635.5 (DR10), a galaxy whose morphology is classified as "Spiral" in GZ1, and whose spectroscopic redshift is 0.044:



And here is a FIRST image, centered on the brighter lobe (the spiral is about midway between the two faint, extended sources):


c_cld

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2014, 09:59:20 pm »

Quote
This was one found by antikodon that I remembered HAndernach commented on: http://radiotalk.galaxyzoo.org/#/subjects/ARG00036hs

If you click the link, you'll see that zooite antikodon wrote, on January 27 2014 2:11 PM, "#overedge #doublelobe host (?)"; HAndernach (SCIENTIST) replied, at 8:49 PM the same day, "SDSS J132435.81+084635.5= ASK 482820.0, an IR- and HI emitting spiral with an FRII morphology, EXTREMELY RARE, should be followed up!"

Here is SDSS J132435.81+084635.5 (DR10), a galaxy whose morphology is classified as "Spiral" in GZ1, and whose spectroscopic redshift is 0.044:



And here is a FIRST image, centered on the brighter lobe (the spiral is about midway between the two faint, extended sources):



Sorry, there are no radio source at the left of the spiral opposite to the radio lobe of ARG00036hs. I see only noise.

You could check by a FIRST Catalog Search on the position of the spiral 1237671956441596126 at coords 13:24:35.81, +08:46:35.57  with a radius of 4.5 arcmin.

Search Results

Searching for first_cat sources within 270.000 arcsec of
13 24 35.810 +08 46 35.57 (J2000)

Map RMS at search position is 0.149 mJy/beam
Catalog detection limit (including CLEAN bias) at source position is 1.00 mJy/beam

3 sources found within 270.000 arcsec

                                                                                    FIRST Catalog Database (2013jun05)                                                                                   
-------------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Do  Get Get  | Search     RA (2000)   Dec (2000)   Side   Peak     Int.     RMS   Deconv.  Deconv.  Deconv  Meas.     Meas.      Meas.    Field Name   SDSS Closest SDSS  SD 2MAS Closest 2MASS  Mean      Mean      RMS   
NED Opt FRST | Distance                            lobe   Flux     Flux    (mJy/   MajAx    MinAx   PosAng  MajAx     MinAx     PosAng                 Mtch  SDSS    i    Cl Mtch 2MASS    K     Epoch    Epoch     Epoch   
SrchImg Img  | (arcsec)                            Prob  (mJy/bm)  (mJy)   beam)  (arcsec) (arcsec) (deg)  (arcsec)  (arcsec)  (degrees)               <8"  Sep(")  (mag)    <8"  Sep(")  (mag) (year)    (MJD)     (MJD)   
-------------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NED OPT FIMG |    68.5  13 24 31.345 +08 46 53.22 0.016     1.92    17.35  0.147    16.47    14.22   71.7     17.33     15.21       71.7 13240+08421I    0   99.00 99.00  -    0   99.00 99.00 2000.062 2451567.0     0.410
NED OPT FIMG |    84.1  13 24 30.273 +08 46 54.03 0.014     2.19     7.19  0.146     9.23     7.16   76.6     10.69      8.97       76.6 13240+08421I    0   99.00 99.00  -    0   99.00 99.00 2000.062 2451567.0     0.413
NED OPT FIMG |   203.9  13 24 32.185 +08 49 52.22 0.014    10.45    11.58  0.152     2.57     0.16   59.1      5.98      5.40       59.1 13240+08421I    3    0.16 15.70  g    1    0.12 13.95 2000.061 2451566.9     0.586
-------------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Redo this search for having images on clicking the links provided in the results.

To me, Object FIRSTJ132430.2+084654 looks like a hourglass without optical counterpart  :(

JeanTate

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2014, 01:56:43 am »
My first attempt at producing FIRST plus SDSS images, of the candidates.

Here's the last candidate in the OP, SDSS J112811.63+241746.9 (ARG00022wh - that's a link):



And here's the same object, zoomed out a bit, with FIRST data added, in red1



More later.

1 Yes, it's mostly artistic, in that the intensity/flux transform is, um, rather arbitrary; the pixels in the FIRST data were smoothed with a Gaussian blur

ETA: I've added some names to the RGZ candidates, to more easily keep track of them
« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 01:53:25 pm by JeanTate »

JeanTate

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ARG0002esa SDSS J140535.56+190612.9 (infoservador)
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2014, 02:59:21 am »
The second-last one, SDSS J140535.56+190612.9 (ARG0002esa - that's a link):



Zoomed out, same scale as in my last post (0.36"/pix), but no grid:



ETA: I've added some names to the RGZ candidates, to more easily keep track of them

UPDATE: SkyView composite, SDSS DR7 r-band (DR10 wouldn't load, strange) with FIRST contours in red (0 min, 6 levels, contour smoothing 8 ) and DR10 image (432"x432", 600x600 pix @0.72"/pix)):



Is this galaxy - the Eos - the likely host of the radio emission? Of the nuclear emission, certainly. Of the oddly-shaped, extended FIRSTJ140538.4+190606 source? There's what could be core radio emission ~2' to the E (left), but no apparent optical host (several very faint galaxies are possible), and no second lobe further E. Nor is there a counterpart lobe, to the W of the Eos. So we're left with "maybe".

fair
« Last Edit: June 17, 2014, 01:38:46 pm by JeanTate »

JeanTate

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2014, 03:23:03 am »
Last one for now, the second candidate, SDSS J122640.22+253855.5 (ARG0001zj8 - that's a link):



The scale on this one is 0.18"/pix, so it looks rather noisy:



Over in RGZ Talk, in the spiral galaxy with doublelobe emission thread, WizardHowl has posted several more interesting objects; I'll add the ones which seem to me to be good disk-galaxy-with-radio-jet(s)/lobe(s) later.

ETA: I've added some names to the RGZ candidates, to more easily keep track of them
« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 01:59:32 pm by JeanTate »

c_cld

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2014, 02:03:44 pm »
Known spiral with radio jet: NGC 5548 , UGC 09149,   Mrk 1509  ,   WISE J141759.55+250812.7
SDSS J141759.54+250812.7 1237665532785786979 z spec=0.016



FIRST cutout:



SDSS and FIRST images side by side with Aladin:


The first lobe is at a projected linear size of 54arcsec from the core and the further at 1.7 arcmin, i.e. 17.66kpc and 33.35kpc respectively at redshift 0.0162  :D
« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 02:23:12 pm by c_cld »

c_cld

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2014, 03:03:18 pm »
Another spectacular AGN previously posted in Active galaxies with ionized gas clouds

SDSS J084002.36+294902.6 1237660961862189211 z 0.06484
2MASX J08400233+2949027  -- Seyfert 2 Galaxy Morphological type:    Sc D ~
FIRST J084000.8+294838


FIRST cutout:


My coadded SDSS/FIRST images:


The north lobe is coincident with the pink cloud in SDSS told in AGN post!
 8) 8)


[edit]
This object SDSS J084002.36+294902.6 587735240637284507,  4C 29.30
is tabulated in Table 1. Candidate AGN with extended emission-line clouds (T=found in targeted survey of known AGN in column Search)
of paper The Galaxy Zoo survey for giant AGN-ionized clouds: past and present black-hole accretion events by William C. Keel, S. Drew Chojnowski et al. , 20 Dec 2011   8)
« Last Edit: February 27, 2014, 05:19:32 pm by c_cld »

JeanTate

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ARG0002zck SDSS J154336.07+110512.9 (infobservador)
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2014, 04:02:12 pm »
Finishing off the four candidates in the OP, ARG0002zck, SDSS J154336.07+110512.9:



The scale on this one is also 0.18"/pix, so it looks rather noisy:



As noted in the RGZ thread discussing this object, it's possible the radio source is an hourglass, with the host a faint IR source in the center (there's no SDSS object at that location); if so, it'd be a chance alignment.  :( I'll see if I can create a WISE+FIRST composite image later.

ETA: Later is now. The cyan image is WISE 4.6μ (contrast boosted, and blurred); the red the same FIRST image as used in the composite above. The bright 4.6μ IR source in the center is the disturbed (merging spiral?) galaxy seen clearly in the SDSS image; it looks structureless in the WISE image because the WISE PSF has a FWHM of ~5":



UPDATE: I'm revisiting the objects I'd posted earlier, with a view to applying the two criteria consistently.

Quote
ARG0002zck | SDSS J154336.07+110512.9 | infobservador | discovery (January 14 2014 10:38 PM) | images | 0.084 sp

Start with the DR10 image, scale 0.18"/pix, 108"x108", centered on SDSS J154336.07+110512.9:



Yes! not a boring elliptical.

SkyView composite, DR7 SDSS r-band (faded to all-but invisibility) with FIRST contours (0 min, 4 levels, contour smoothing 8 ) and above DR10 image:



Radio emission is/extends beyond optical boundary of galaxy? Check.

Is this galaxy the likely host of the radio emission? We definitely need a radio astronomer to weigh in on that!  ::) However, it could be an hourglass, or a jet/lobe; either way, the axis seems to point right at the galaxy's nucleus. To be conservative, I'd have to say "maybe", so fair (but wouldn't be soooo cool if there were a faint counter lobe - symmetrically placed of course).

UPDATE 2: In the RGZ Talk thread The IR source is like a cross, a post by a radio astronomer:

Quote from: 42jkb SCIENTIST (June 17 2014 6:05 AM)
I would have to say that the spiral galaxy is not related to the radio emission. The radio indicates a double lobe structure so I would say that it is related to another galaxy which is too faint for SDSS to detect.

So, a demotion to poor.  :(
« Last Edit: June 17, 2014, 08:31:02 am by JeanTate »

JeanTate

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2014, 07:49:01 pm »
Still in catch-up mode ...

The galaxy in the center is, obviously, not an elliptical. It is also - obviously - associated with a pair of radio jets/lobes. This galaxy is called 0313-192  ::) and is the subject of a 2006 paper by W. Keel, R. White, F. Owen, and M. Ledlow2 (you might recognize the first author ... he's none other than our very own zooite, NGC3314!).

Since 2006, a small number of papers have reported similar spiral/radio jet/lobe associations; unfortunately, all the objects seem to be like 0313-192, outside the SDSS footprint!  :(

From the Radio source thread:

1237655493836013770 SDSS J140948.85-030232.5
587729772611109079
Discovery of a spiral-host episodic radio-galaxy
Quote from:  Ananda Hota
We report the discovery of a unique radio galaxy at z=0.137, which could possibly be the second spiral-host large radio galaxy and also the second triple-double episodic radio galaxy. The host galaxy shows signs of recent star formation in the UV but is optically red and is the brightest galaxy of a possible cluster. The outer relic radio lobes of this galaxy, separated by ~1 Mpc, show evidence of spectral flattening and a high fraction of linear polarisation. We interpret that these relic lobes have experienced re-acceleration of particles and compression of the magnetic field due to shocks in the cluster outskirts. From the morphology of the relics and galaxy distribution, we argue that re-acceleration is unlikely to be due to a cluster-cluster merger and suggest the possibility of accretion shocks. The source was identified from SDSS, GALEX, NVSS and FIRST survey data but we also present follow up optical observations with the Lulin telescope and 325 MHz low frequency radio observations with the GMRT. We briefly discuss the scientific potential of this example in understanding the evolution of galaxies and clusters by accretion, mergers, star formation, and AGN feedback.
Exotic Galaxy Reveals Tantalizing Tale


dubbed Speca (an acronym for Spiral-host Episodic radio galaxy tracing Cluster Accretion)  ;D


SDSS J140948.85-030232.5 1237655493836013770 z spec=0.138
NAME SPECA -- Radio Galaxy  http://www.galaxyzooforum.org/index.php?topic=8905.msg571587#msg571587



FIRST image: double lobe



Superposition SDSS/FIRST



 8) 8)

Speca is, obviously, in the SDSS footprint.  ::)

But the Hota+ 2011 paper does not cite Keel+ 2006!  :o

It does, however, cite a 1998 one, "An Unusual Radio Galaxy in Abell 428: A Large, Powerful FR I Source in a Disk-dominated Host" (by Ledlow, Owen, and Keel), which is about the same "0313-192" galaxy.  ::)

JeanTate

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2014, 08:03:50 pm »
Still from that thread:

SDSS J132117.81+423515.2 1237662196142047400 z spec=0.079
3C 285 -- Active Galaxy Nucleus



FIRST #double lobe




Superposition SDSS/FIRST


Also posted, by c_cld, in the RGZ Talk thread Did any GZ zooites discover unusual radio galaxies?1 Some discussion ensued:

Quote from:  me (February 23 2014 3:14 PM)
Morphologically, the host seems to me to be a disturbed disk galaxy, likely a merger. It's an AGN, and it clearly has two radio lobes, making it a DRAGN. It would thus seem to meet raynorris (scientist)'s criterion for being a radio-loud spiral. Yet as it's a 3C object, it's surely been investigated to death a long time ago, so what are we missing?

Here's the DR10 image, zoomed in:


Quote from: c_cld (February 23 2014 3:56 PM)
3C 285

The Interaction between Radio Lobes and Hot Gas in the Nearby Radio Galaxies 3C 285 and 3C 442A

paper related to proposal OPTICAL EMISSION IN DOUBLE RADIO GALAXY LOBES: CYCLE 4, HST Proposal 5156, Philippe Crane, NASA Headquarters

Quote from: WizardHowl (February 23 2014 3:57 PM)
I wouldn't assume that just because a radio-loud galaxy is in 3C it means we won't learn anything from looking them up in SDSS - there's always the possibility the association between the radio and optical has not been made before. This applies especially to strange radio morphologies as well as galaxies that are very faint in optical. As an example look at 3C 343, which appears in RGZ as http://radiotalk.galaxyzoo.org/#/subjects/ARG00001qs and has an optical host in SDSS: I could not find a spectrum for the host galaxy in NED/SDSS! By all means add the above DRAGN spiral to the list of objects in the thread started by raynorris :)

1 Link takes you to the thread; while you can sometimes find a way to get the URL of an individual post in a v2 Talk thread, in this case I couldn't, so you'll just have to wade through the whole thread to find the posts I am referring to.  :P

JeanTate

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2014, 08:15:33 pm »
3 Unfortunately, I don't seem to be able to make composite SDSS/radio images  :'(

Over in the Radio source thread:

may I just ask: Where is everyone getting these images from?

Superposition image is my  manual work of stacking images from
SDSS DR10 Chart tool
and
Extract FIRST Image Cutouts

 :P

This is my chance to publicly thank c_cld for posting the link to Stega, and, more importantly, to helping me work out how to create composite/superposition/overlay images!  8) :-*

My source for WISE and FIRST images is NASA's SkyView; I use the SkyView Query Form to obtain black-n-white JPG files, 500x500 pix in size, and with a 'plate scale' the same as that of the SDSS DR10 image I plan to use. Of course, it's important to make sure that the (RA, Dec) of the center of the images is the same!  :P I then process the JPG images with GIMP (I'm sure any decent image processing tool would work just as well), upload to Photobucket (and there are plenty of other such web-based services), ...

JeanTate

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Re: Friday, 21 February, 2014: Very Strange Spirals?
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2014, 09:39:25 pm »
One of the things which Talk is good for is Collections.

I have a RGZ one, called 'Spirals' with a jet (or jets) and/or a lobe (or lobes), into which I have been putting candidate objects, as I myself have found, and as noted by other zooites. It will surely contain objects that do not really belong, even as candidates; for example, a radio source may appear to coincide with an object which a RGZ zooite thinks is a spiral, but it may turn out to be not a spiral, or for the radio source to be nuclear (either an AGN or a nuclear starburst) or associated with a region of intense star-formation (where many SNR may reside).

As I identify good candidates, I'll post them here - together with composite FIRST + WISE/SDSS images, as appropriate - and add a note to the objects in the collection.