Author Topic: supernovae thread  (Read 64011 times)

rmarzi

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supernovae thread
« on: August 18, 2007, 08:57:23 pm »
post here all the galaxies where you can see supernovae

587728309641085000

http://cas.sdss.org/astro/en/tools/chart/chart.asp?ra=172.77615342&dec=3.13066135



here its in the top right hand corner
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smilecdl

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2007, 09:03:32 pm »
How do you know it is a supernova?  Could be many things (including a supernova).  Without spectral analysis of that exact region, or an image taken sometime previously not showing the bright spot how would we know?
Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind- bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.

rmarzi

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2007, 09:12:30 pm »
agreed but what else could it be , its definitely not a superimposition effect and is not the first one i get , the variation in brightness comes from within the galaxy .
I d love to ask a zookeeper for an opinion
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smilecdl

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2007, 09:14:49 pm »
Could be a star formation region - especially as it appears to be on the edge of a spiral arm.
Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind- bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.

rmarzi

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2007, 09:18:15 pm »
i ve noticed that it only occurs in around 1 in 70-80 and seems to be happening in spirals , the last one i saw had two and were not the typical blue that seems to occur in star forming region , one was red .
As i said i d love to ask a zookeeper
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rmarzi

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2007, 09:22:15 pm »
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watchingthesky

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2007, 07:17:48 pm »
rmarzi,  neither of these is a supernova.  You had posted one of these in another thread and it was proven to not be a supernova because it was visible in the Palomar images taken some fifty years ago.

I checked for the first image in this thread.  It is also in the older image.

To make a claim for a supernova, the general procedure is to first check previous images to see if it was not there.  Once it is determined it to not be in earlier images, then you post about a possible supernova for others to verify.  Even then that does not confirm a supernova.  It's spectrum then needs to be imaged. 

The following link might be helpful bright supernova

Superposition of stars is extremely common.  As a visual supernova observer and hunter, there have several times I was extremely excited about possibly discovering a supernova through the eyepiece only to be disappointed to find it was not.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2007, 07:34:10 pm by watchingthesky »
The stars were as thick as weeds in an unkempt field... - Isaac Asimov, Foundation and Empire

EricFDiaz

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2007, 12:42:41 am »
Thanks, watchingthesky for the link. That's a great site on supernovae.  :o :o :o

rmarzi

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rmarzi

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2007, 11:14:47 am »
the blue object in the galaxy is classified as a galaxy by sdss
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rmarzi

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2007, 09:55:15 am »
small possible one in the  middle , not the two large one



http://cas.sdss.org/astro/en/tools/chart/chart.asp?ra=240.54720466&dec=33.47588775

587736752468000802

marked as a star
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Edd

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2007, 10:07:24 am »
Watchingthesky's right I think. You really need images taking at different times you can compare. This is already done by a team within SDSS.
When I look up at the night sky and think about the billions of stars out there, I think to myself: I'm amazing. - Peter Serafinowicz

rmarzi

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Edd

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2007, 12:16:03 pm »
OK, you want to be ruling out stuff that hasn't changed. Here's one way to do that...

Go to the DSS (not to be confused with SDSS, although the DSS stands for the same thing in each!). If the object you want to find is called something like 'J093427.81+390616.5' that means the RA is 09:34:28 and the dec is 39:06:17. Put those in the form, and ask for a gif. You'll get something like this and hopefully you'll be able to make out if your object has developed any new spots recently.
When I look up at the night sky and think about the billions of stars out there, I think to myself: I'm amazing. - Peter Serafinowicz

rmarzi

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Re: supernovae thread
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2007, 12:31:38 pm »
will try , thx i m not a professional or amateur astronomer , just someone who has recently got interested in the subject
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