Author Topic: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)  (Read 225221 times)

Hrundi

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2007, 12:57:52 am »
Planetary nebula is my bet.

Mantiss

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2007, 01:05:54 am »
A lovely planetary nebula, but I don't know the name.
Stunning image, Wish I'd find anything other than blobs myself  ;D :P
The impossible often has a kind of integrity which the merely improbable lacks.
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thaumielx72

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2007, 02:00:14 am »
The object you're referring to is actually at:
http://cas.sdss.org/astro/en/tools/explore/obj.asp?id=588018091083890728

Its called Abell 39 - a Planetary Nebula.

A brief quote from http://home.earthlink.net/~astro-app/essays/fuzzy-objects07.htm:

"The truly spherical nature of this beautiful nebula helps us eliminate a common confusion concerning the actual three-dimensional geometry of most nebulae," said George Jacoby, director of the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-Noao Observatory...

The nebula is about five light-years across, and the thickness of the spherical shell is about a third of a light-year (a light-year is about 10 million, million km or six million, million miles).

Located deep in the constellation of Hercules, Abell 39 is about 7,000 light-years distant.

Unquote.

It was NASA'a astronomy picture of the day back on January 23, 2001, but our photo here is better than anything I could find on the web.

Happy Hunting.   :)

Mantiss

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #18 on: August 03, 2007, 03:27:16 am »
Ah it's been put in APOD a few years back:

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap050728.html

The impossible often has a kind of integrity which the merely improbable lacks.
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Lensman3rd

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2007, 06:09:04 am »
Thank you thaumielx72, I was leaning towards super or hypernova myself, thinking that was the first sphere of ejection, it is beautiful. Wonder if we'll get to see it as a smoke ring before collapse?

Delmarn

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2007, 06:11:28 am »
Thats awsome!

Manustar

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2007, 06:12:52 am »
beautiful, nothing to add

gumbosea

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2007, 07:12:48 am »
What an amazing object!
Interestingly enough, there is a small galaxy almost directly due south
of the central star which lies behind the expanding spherical shell
of this nebula:

SDSS J162733.43+275317.5
GALAXY    ra=246.88931607, dec=27.88820253,   ObjId = 588018091083890709

http://cas.sdss.org/astro/en/tools/explore/obj.asp?id=588018091083890709

If you examine the spectra for this galaxy, you find that the spectra for this
nebula is visible as well.  A very strong blue line at 5000 Angstroms, and a weaker
red line at approx. 6600 Angstroms, which gives a nice deep purple.

I was also able to find a astronomical white-paper detailing the the specta
of this nebula, which confirms locations the fore-mentioned spectral lines
(see Figure 5). Here is the link if you're interested:

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/ApJ/journal/issues/ApJ/v560n1/53200/53200.html

The Astrophysical Journal, 560:272-286, 2001 October 10
© 2001. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

The Planetary Nebula A39: An Observational Benchmark for Numerical Modeling of Photoionized Plasmas

George. H. Jacoby 1,2,3
Kitt Peak National Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726; jacoby@noao.edu
Gary. J. Ferland 2
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506; gary@cloud9.pa.uky.edu
and
Kirk T. Korista
Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008; korista@wmich.edu

Received 2000 December 13; accepted 2001 June 12

What marvelous resources they have for astronomy these days on the web. It is truly
an age of "miracles and wonders"!





Edd

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2007, 08:09:27 am »
Well done EBiianov. Object of the Day!
http://www.galaxyzooforum.org/index.php?topic=1771.0
When I look up at the night sky and think about the billions of stars out there, I think to myself: I'm amazing. - Peter Serafinowicz

thaumielx72

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #24 on: August 03, 2007, 09:37:27 am »
Yes!  Congrats (or props)!!!!

serpens

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #25 on: August 18, 2007, 11:41:00 am »
Of course. This object was posted many times before. It's a planetary nebula called PN G164.8+31.1  - outer layers of a dying star, gently thrown away in the space forming sometimes extremely intricate structures. The central star would then be a white dwarf.

mitch.wheat

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mitch.wheat

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2007, 11:42:00 am »
Not so sure about the 'gently' !!!

serpens

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #28 on: August 18, 2007, 11:44:44 am »
Perhaps the layers are still expelled quite fast, but it's relatively gentle, compared to a supernova for example.

http://www.blackskies.org/intro.html - here's a wonderful site on planetary nebulae. The process of expelling outer layers can take thousands of years if not more, and the velocities are probably similar to those of normal solar wind (but this is just my guess). It's not such a sudden outburst like a supernova.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2007, 11:48:46 am by serpens »

mitch.wheat

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Re: The Nebulae Collection (formed from many threads)
« Reply #29 on: August 18, 2007, 11:55:12 am »
I'm learning so much here. Thanks serpens.  BTW, have you seen over at the hubble site, the 'supernova' that's frozen (~ -273K). finite energy, massive expansion = cooling (just like a fridge really!) very cool, ahem!