Author Topic: Possible strong gravitational lenses  (Read 562470 times)

JeanTate

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7140 on: June 24, 2014, 07:22:39 pm »
Thanks Capella05, NGC3314.

If any ordinary zooite were interested in following up on this, what could they do (on their own)?

Here's what I can think of:
  • check out what's in NED and SIMBAD, read the references listed (if any)
  • find all publicly available images of this object, in all wavebands, by using MAST and SkyView (and more?)
  • download all relevant FITS (to get the actual data, not images), and do analyses such as simple lens modelling
  • email any professional astronomer you think may have access to PS1 data1, to see if they'd be kind enough to send you a FITS

Any other suggestions?

1 PS1 is deeper than SDSS, and at a different epoch; however, there is as yet no public DR. Institutions in the consortium have 'pre-public release' access to the data

ElisabethB

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7141 on: June 24, 2014, 07:28:45 pm »
I really don't want to be a party pooper, but I don't think there will be lots, if any, additional images and information on this galaxy. it is a very small and insignificant galaxy. But I would love to be proven wrong, obviously ! But don't send people on a wild goose chase either ! Sometimes, there is just no extra info available ! .

JeanTate

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7142 on: June 24, 2014, 07:48:55 pm »
I really don't want to be a party pooper, but I don't think there will be lots, if any, additional images and information on this galaxy. it is a very small and insignificant galaxy. But I would love to be proven wrong, obviously ! But don't send people on a wild goose chase either ! Sometimes, there is just no extra info available ! .

You are very likely correct, Els (you nearly always are!).

My intention - in the post - isn't so much to say that this is what I think any ordinary zooite should do; rather, it was to indicate what - as far as I know - ordinary zooites could do (if they were sufficiently motivated).

For the broader context, consider SDSS1133. "Discovery" in astronomy is a very complex thing; if SDSS1133 turns out to be as extraordinary as Hanny's Voorwerp (in the sense of being a very rare object, and one which gives us a window into astrophysical processes that are of great interest but otherwise essentially invisible), how will - should - ordinary zooites' posts, here in the GZ forum, on this object be treated? My impression is this (and it's no more than a vague feeling): simply noting it as being unusual in some way doesn't necessarily attract much notice; if, on the other hand, you've done some work to characterize it further (i.e. beyond 'it looks odd in this SDSS image'), you are more likely to be recognized as a discoverer (in some sense).

Another perspective: there are, very likely, more 'weird and wonderful' objects in SDSS, UKIDSS, FIRST, CANDELS, ... than there are professional astronomers. Sometimes - Green Peas, etc - what we zooites notice as being particularly weird (especially if we can identify the characteristics which make it weird, and find a dozen or more further candidates) do attract the attention of our professional colleagues. Often, however, they do not. Yet many of the super-zooites (etc) have exceptionally keen eyes (and brains), and may well have spotted something which does, in the end, turn out to be very important. If they cannot articulate why it's so unusual, or cannot attract the attention of any professional colleague - but they still feel strongly that there is something notable/different/important - they are not powerless to act. They can do their own, independent astronomy research. As indeed our fellow Planet Hunters zooites have done.

ElisabethB

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7143 on: June 24, 2014, 08:00:14 pm »
Erm, yes !  Insert slightly bewildered emoticon ! What is your point? I have no idea what you are talking about.
People should alert the science team to something strange ? We do that all the time. Most of the time it is nothing special. So, what is the problem ? And no, I'm not going to get sucked into a pointless discussion about what should or should not be done ! :D

JeanTate

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7144 on: June 24, 2014, 08:58:37 pm »
Erm, yes !  Insert slightly bewildered emoticon ! What is your point? I have no idea what you are talking about.
Oops!  :P :-[

Quote
People should alert the science team to something strange ? We do that all the time. Most of the time it is nothing special. So, what is the problem ?
Yes (but only if they want to), yes (but only some of us do), and yes (but occasionally it's not).

There's no "problem"  :)

I was simply (or not  ::) ) pointing out that if any zooite is interested in investigating any particular strange object (beyond eyeballing it), there are a number of things they can do, themselves, if they are so interested.

The last two paras were my attempt to provide some context; if they were unclear, my apologies for failing to communicate.

Quote
And no, I'm not going to get sucked into a pointless discussion about what should or should not be done ! :D

Well, if that was, for you, a key takeaway, then I really failed to communicate!  :'(

Best I take a break now, I think.

zutopian

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7145 on: June 25, 2014, 11:32:08 am »
Thanks for your interesting post, Jean!
I hadn't known SKyView and PS1 until these had been mentioned recently in two different "Objects of the Day" by you. I started to use the SkyView related to Radio Zoo images, as you know.
I would like to mention a related comment by you in a recent GZ Talk discussion about a different lens candidate.:

Quote
(...)
This thread may also be a good place to start a discussion on the how of following up on lens candidates. For example, if there were a spectrum of this galaxy (there isn't, or at least not an SDSS one), at least several zooites could have a go at analyzing it, to see if there's any evidence of a lensed galaxy (or other features, such as a polar ring, perhaps).
http://talk.galaxyzoo.org/#/boards/BGZ0000004/discussions/DGZ0000slg
« Last Edit: June 25, 2014, 01:50:07 pm by zutopian »

Budgieye

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planetaryscience

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7147 on: June 27, 2014, 02:04:34 pm »


http://www.galaxyzoo.org/#/examine/AGZ0003qhy
two blue blobs near nucleus, I know not hopeful
http://skyserver.sdss3.org/dr8/en/tools/explore/obj.asp?id=1237671763709132878

If you zoom out, you will quickly notice that the galaxy is part of an interacting triple (maybe quadruple) group:


And if you zoom in you will notice that the two main galaxies are pulling material from one another:


I would consider it more than likely that the areas of starforming that you see belong to the galaxy, and are areas of star formation left over from a recent flyby/pass through of the other galaxy.
I like to find asteroids and galaxy mergers- but all galaxies are still fine to me.

Capella05

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7148 on: June 27, 2014, 02:34:38 pm »
Um, planetaryscience.... you do know that Budgieye is a Spacewarps Science team member and a GZ moderator.

I am sure she is aware on how to zoom out  ;D She most likely just posted the image to keep a record of it  - as Budgie herself said, it is an unlikely candidate.

Budgieye

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7149 on: June 28, 2014, 10:54:58 pm »
Yeah, ...I really should post more in the Forum, to Be Seen. I have been away in SpaceWarps for a year. I'm not a moderator in the Forum, only in Talk.

This is a pretty a sad excuse for a lens, but I did want to keep a record of it, using as many IDs that I could find.

Budgieye

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7150 on: July 05, 2014, 05:30:21 am »
Bright pink galaxy is an artifact Too bad, because it is so pretty!
This is an image from the UKIDSS infrared survey.
The galaxy off to the side is very pink.
Is there a way of checking if this is on a possible lens list?
NED titles of radio and X ray source

EDIT: Zutopian thinks AGN


http://www.galaxyzoo.org/subjects/standard/524482bc3ae74054bf00fcb9.jpg

http://talk.galaxyzoo.org/#/subjects/AGZ0007jrq


http://skyserver.sdss3.org/dr8/en/tools/explore/obj.asp?id=1237664093972988210

yellow in SDSS dr8 image
http://skyservice.pha.jhu.edu/DR8/ImgCutout/getjpeg.aspx?ra=129.7441601&dec=26.13818319&scale=0.2&width=200&height=200&opt=G)

http://skyserver.sdss3.org/dr8/en/tools/explore/obj.asp?id=1237662225657299218
CGCG 120-016 NED02
SDSS J083859.28+260813.1
round galaxy http://skyserver.sdss3.org/dr8/en/tools/explore/obj.asp?id=1237662225657299218


« Last Edit: July 06, 2014, 06:47:47 am by Budgieye »

Budgieye

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7151 on: July 06, 2014, 06:46:51 am »


http://talk.galaxyzoo.org/#/subjects/AGZ00037jg

almost certainly stars, but just in case


c_cld

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7152 on: July 09, 2014, 03:31:25 pm »
Recent releases of HST observations of selected sample SLACS lens systems targets:
Discovering the Dark Side of CDM Substructure HST Proposal 12898, PI: Leon Koopmans (Kapteyn Astronomical Institute )
Cycle: 20 Proposal type: GO

dataset
IBZI19010 SDSS J143004.10+410557.1  1237661874024677506

IBZI21010 SDSS J162746.44-005357.5 1237648672922862552

IBZI30010 SDSS J234111.57+000018.6 1237663784195326209   
« Last Edit: July 09, 2014, 03:48:14 pm by c_cld »

zutopian

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Re: Possible strong gravitational lenses
« Reply #7153 on: July 09, 2014, 08:10:12 pm »
New paper:

The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. XII. Extending Strong Lensing to Lower Masses
Yiping Shu, Adam S. Bolton, Joel R. Brownstein, Antonio D. Montero-Dorta, Léon V. E. Koopmans, Tommaso Treu, Raphaël Gavazzi, Matthew W. Auger, Oliver Czoske, Philip J. Marshall, Leonidas A. Moustakas
(Submitted on 8 Jul 2014)
Quote
We present observational results from a new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot program to extend the methods of the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey to lower lens-galaxy masses. We confirm and model 40 new strong lenses from this program, which we supplement with 58 lenses previously discovered by SLACS.
http://arxiv.org/abs/1407.2240